AN UNPUBLISHED LETTER BY DHORUBA BIN WAHAD

An Unpublished Letter

August 28, 1989

To the Editor of the New York Times:

Your editorial of August 24, 1989, “The Black Panther’s Two Paths” proved once again that the aversive face of racism still relies firmly upon half-truths and distortions of the Black Experience in America and that the white media is as dedicated as ever to perpetuating such distortions.

The simplistic “two path” editorial premise offered in your eulogy to the late Huey P. Newton, co-founder of the destroyed Black Panther Party, revealed more than it intended to conceal.

Your editorial was obviously written to make your white middle-class readers (and those “blacks” who share both their cowardice and illusion) feel safe. Perhaps closing the chapter on the Panthers and the threat they represented to red-white-and-blue sensibilities can reconcile all of the injustices done and lies portrayed as “news.” Indeed the unwary reader who has never lived through the terror of racist government repression, who has never struggled on the front lines of the “Black Liberation Movement” in the U.S. and consequently has not confronted the legitimized lawlessness and brutality of the instruments and agents of white privilege and power could never imagine that the classic nationalist message of Black power, Black pride, self-determination, community control, is something that white America has historically sought to purge from the minds of African-American youth by means of murder, false imprisonment, intimidation, etc. of Black activists and leaders.

Your editorial failed to mention the third “path,” that of the black political prisoner in the U.S., some former Panther leaders (such as myself, Elmer “Geronimo” Pratt and others) were forced to take as targets of the racist and politically repressive Counter Intelligence Program (COINTELPRO) (which curiously the Times never once mentioned in either its obituary on Huey Newton or in its August 24th editorial). The U.S. has always reserved its most racist, brutal, and unjust treatment for people of color who will not compromise their principles or barter away their humanity. The victims of the racist “campaign of repression that, within a few years, put the Panthers out of business” as your editorial so glibly put it, still languish in prisons today, largely ignored by the white media. Clearly the tyranny of racist majority values and rule can be, and are, portrayed as the democratic and social ideal that African-Americans must live and die by.

Huey Newton was destroyed long before he died on an Oakland ghetto street. Newton went to prison in 1968 as a symbol of uncompromising resistance to subjugation by racist police violence. Racist and violent America could tolerate no such symbol for Black wo/manhood. COINTELPRO destroyed Newton while he was imprisoned and afterwards helped render him a paranoid egotistic drug abuser incapable of serving the interests of his own people. This is what white America wanted, and this is what white America achieved. Newton’s death is therefore not only a metaphor for a generation of Black men and women who responded to the FBI-engineered assassinations of Dr. King and Malcolm X with militant determination to be black and free, but also a commentary on the current state of the African-American community. a community inundated by design with drugs, crime, high unemployment, homelessness. This is what white America wanted when its instruments of repression destroyed the Panthers and this is what haunts white America today.

It wasn’t Huey Newton, who couldn’t quite make the turn toward white male middle-class respectability, who was the loser as your editorial suggests, but a racist society which refuses to turn away from its sickness and toward the truth. At least Newton, at one point in his life, possessed the courage to stand up and bear powerful witness to the truth of his people’s experience – the African-American experience – rather than to suffer silently in the thrall of racist America. The failure of Huey P. Newton was a failure of white America’s values. Indeed, to act and even fail shows courage; the greatest tragedy is to be an accomplice in one’s own oppression.

Sincerely,

Dhoruba Bin Wahad, African-American political prisoner
Napanoch, NY

Dhoruba Bin Wahad; formerly R. Dhoruba Moore, was a New Black Panther Party leader who served 19 years of a 25-years-to life sentence for the 1971 wounding of two policemen. Shortly before his arrest, he had been acquitted in the 1969 Panther 21 conspiracy case which drew nationwide attention.

On March 1990, his conviction was overturned by a New York State Supreme Court ruling; based on the withholding of evidence by the prosecution. And on March 22, he was released on his own recognizance. As LOOT goes to press, tile Manhattan District Attorney’s office is considering appealing the decision or instituting a new trial. It seems likely, however, that the charges will, finally, be dropped.

(source)

 

“Justice is for the living ’cause Nobody gets out this Life alive”

Justice is for the living

“Many, Many, Many Men wish death on me”.. most of em, are dearly departed now. We were the Last of the Loud – but no more Shoutin’ now Cause God ain’t Deaf. It’s the Powerful among us who are deaf, so no more Crying on TV, Moaning and Groanin’ bout how White Folks don’t value our Lives and mobilizing a Movement led by Victimhood that claims the Dead need Justice. Justice is for the Living ’cause Nobody gets out this Life alive. That’s why most of the families of Black victims of racist law enforcement only get money settlements and Justice eludes the Black Community. Justice is for the masses of the living. So ultimately a people, any people. must decide for themselves whether it’s Freedom for Everybody – or Grief for Everybody. True Democracy and Self-determination can peacefully blossom, but seldom in history has that been the case. Seldom in history has there been a peaceful revolution of values and fortune without first a democratic distribution of the pain. So if this Generation truly believe their lives matter what’s the hold up? So just like back in the day, if you looked for me in the Whirlwind – you’d wouldn’t find a victim….cause nobody get’s out of this Life alive and it’s in the Whirlwind of Struggle we are truly “Citizens” – Not Victims.

 

Dhoruba Bin Wahad welcomed Nelson Mandela in Harlem 1990.
Dhoruba Bin Wahad was a leader member of the new York Black Panther Party, a Field Secretary of the BPP responsible for organizing chapters throughout the East Coast, and a member of the Panther 21. Arrested June 1971, he was framed as part of the illegal FBI Counter Intelligence program (COINTELPRO) and subjected to unfair treatment and torture during his nineteen years in prison.
During Dhoruba’s incarceration, litigation on his behalf produced over three hundred thousand pages of COINTELPRO documentation, and upon release in 1990 he was able to bring a successful lawsuit against the New York Department of Corrections for all their wrongdoings and criminal activities.
Living in both Ghana and the U.S. Dhoruba, an uncompromising critic of imperialism and capitalism, continues to write and work promoting freedom for all political prisoners and revolutionary Pan-Africanism.

Learn About Black Panther Party History

The Black Panthers, also known as the Black Panther Party, was a political organization founded in 1966 by Huey Newton and Bobby Seale to challenge police brutality against the African American community. Dressed in black berets and black leather jackets, the Black Panthers organized armed citizen patrols of Oakland and other U.S. cities. At its peak in 1968, the Black Panther Party had roughly 2,000 members. The organization later declined as a result of internal tensions, deadly shootouts and FBI counterintelligence activities aimed at weakening the organization.

Black Panthers History

Black Panther Party founders Huey Newton and Bobby Seale met in 1961 while students at Merritt College in Oakland, California.

They both protested the college’s “Pioneer Day” celebration, which honored the pioneers who came to California in the 1800s, but omitted the role of African Americans in settling the American West. Seale and Newton formed the Negro History Fact Group, which called on the school to offer classes in black history.

They founded the Black Panthers in the wake of the assassination of black nationalist Malcolm X and after police in San Francisco shot and killed an unarmed black teen named Matthew Johnson.

Originally dubbed the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, the organization was founded in October 1966. The Black Panthers’ early activities primarily involved monitoring police activities in black communities in Oakland and other cities.

As they instituted a number of social programs and engaged in political activities, their popularity grew. The Black Panthers drew widespread support from urban centers with large minority communities, including Los Angeles, ChicagoNew York and Philadelphia. By 1968, the Black Panthers had roughly 2,000 members across the country.

Political Activities And Social Programs

Newton and Seale drew on Marxist ideology for the party platform. They outlined the organization’s philosophical views and political objectives in a Ten-Point Program.

The Ten-Point Program called for an immediate end to police brutality; employment for African Americans; and land, housing and justice for all.

The Black Panthers were part of the larger Black Power movement, which emphasized black pride, community control and unification for civil rights.

While the Black Panthers were often portrayed as a gang, their leadership saw the organization as a political party whose goal was getting more African Americans elected to political office. They were unsuccessful on this front. By the early 1970s, FBI counterintelligence efforts, criminal activities and an internal rift between group members weakened the party as a political force.

The Black Panthers did, however, start a number of popular community social programs, including free breakfast programs for school children and free health clinics in 13 African American communities across the United States.

Black Panthers Violence And Controversies

The Black Panthers were involved in numerous violent encounters with police. In 1967, founder Huey Newton allegedly killed Oakland police officer John Frey. Newton was convicted of voluntary manslaughter in 1968 and was sentenced to two to 15 years in prison. An appellate court decision later reversed the conviction.

Eldridge Cleaver, editor of the Black Panther’s newspaper, and 17-year old Black Panther member and treasurer Bobby Hutton, were involved in a shootout with police in 1968 that left Hutton dead and two police officers wounded.

Conflicts within the party often turned violent too. In 1969, Black Panther Party member Alex Rackley was tortured and murdered by other Black Panthers who thought him a police informant.

Black Panther bookkeeper Betty Van Patter was found beaten and murdered in 1974. No one was charged with the death, though many believed that party leadership was responsible.

The FBI And COINTELPRO

The Black Panthers’ socialist message and black nationalist focus made them the target of a secret FBI counterintelligence program called COINTELPRO.

In 1969, the FBI declared the Black Panthers a communist organization and an enemy of the United States government. The first FBI’s first director, J. Edgar Hoover, in 1968 called the Black Panthers, “One of the greatest threats to the nation’s internal security.”

The FBI worked to weaken the Panthers by exploited existing rivalries between black nationalist groups. They also worked to undermine and dismantle the Free Breakfast for Children Program and other community social programs instituted by the Black Panthers.

In 1969, Chicago police gunned down and killed Black Panther Party members Fred Hampton and Mark Clark, who were asleep in their apartment.

About a hundred bullets were fired in what police described as a fierce gun battle with members of the Black Panther Party. However, ballistics experts later determined that only one of those bullets came from the Panthers’ side.

Although the FBI was not responsible for leading the raid, a federal grand jury later indicated that the bureau played a significant role in the events leading up to the raid.

The Black Panther Party officially dissolved in 1982.

 

 BY

 

U. S. AFRICAN AND MIDEAST POLICIES: WAR AS FOREIGN AID AND REGIME CHANGE AS DEMOCRATIC TRANSITION

The following Essay was written by Dhoruba al-Mujahid Bin-Wahad in 2012

Africans in the Diaspora are in a crisis of conscience searching for what it means to be “African centered” or Pan-African, and citizens of Racist Nation-states with histories of Imperial domination. We are confronted today with “New Age Imperialism” where national elites collaborate to oppress the poor and hungry of the planet rather than wage war with each other over the control of strategic resources. This global convergence of interests has found its natural opposition in the international character of the Muslim Ummah and its historical dichotomy with Western Europe (and by Euro phenotypical extension the U.S.).

The US and Race based Democracy – “Democratic Fascism”

In the U.S. where over 2.5 million American citizens are locked away in prison and another 15 plus million are ostracized owners of major “felony” convictions, the African-American population and other national “minorities” of non-European background are subjected to a contrived system of fascism masquerading as “democracy” – a political and social system of police and corporate control, a police state with unprecedented power (after 9/11 terrorist attacks) that employs a “National Security” rationale to conceal its crimes of “rendition”, torture (enhanced interrogation), indefinite detention, and targeted assassinations . Like most modern “national-security” states, U.S. policies are most closely associated with its perceived “national interests” primarily involving access to strategic resources and “trade”. The West’s bogus advocacy of supporting individual freedom by covertly encouraging “Democratic regime change” in Europe’s former colonial territories mask not only their own internal inequalities based on race, religion and gender, but conceal the often violent cooptation of legitimate revolutionary people’s movements that oppose entrenched oligarchies, Autocrats, while marginalizing and demonizing Islamic based anti-imperialist forces across Africa and Mid-East. Islam has replaced the specter of “communist global domination” as the foremost threat to global Finance Capitalism and Western global domination. That the West’s perceives opposition to neo-imperialist diplomacy in secular dimensions, characterizing this opposition as the “clash of civilizations) is not without historical basis.

Up until the overthrow of the western stooge Shah Reza Palhavi of Iran, a strictly Islamic based mass movement had never overthrown a modern non-secular Nation State backed by the Western Imperial powers. Needless to say the Iranian “revolutions” sent shock waves throughout the region and shook regional Sunni comprador classes (Oil Sheikdoms) across the region to their reactionary roots. But to the masses of Muslims on the streets of Arab capitals the Iranian revolution was a ray of hope – but its Shia dimension served the US and Europe’s historical fallback tactic of divide and conquer . We now see how effective the West’s early divide and conquer strategy of containment has been and how it has the region tittering on the brink of war. Many Arab Sunni rulers, with US blessings, covertly intensified their alignment with the European settler-state of Israel to contain Iranian geopolitical influence even as Israel gears up for military strikes against the Islamic Republic. US and NATO troops are stationed in Muslim lands, military bases across the Mid-East are designed to project Western full spectrum military power into the region. All this a consequence of US divide and conquer fear tactics liberally employed against Developing poor nations, particularly those in Africa and the Arab world.

With the support for US militarism abroad (war on terror) a fundamental principle of both the Right wing and “moderates” in the US congress , it is little surprise that white American politicians are also major supporters and instigators of anti-Islamic fervor both inside and outside the US. Because the ramifications of “the war on terror” has disproportionately affected the immigrant Muslim population in the US (African-American Muslims have lived under religious, racial, and political repression for decades) U.S. military and diplomatic actions in Arab countries of North Africa, Iraq, Syria, as well as in Pakistan and India has been characterized as unique, untypical popular resistance or an “Arab Spring”. This definition of uprisings across Muslim North Africa by the western media and westernized Arab intellectuals is contrived to achieve one thing: Dividing the Muslim Ummah along racial and historical sectarian lines, while setting apart Sub-Saharan Africans’ (and its oppressed Muslim Communities) from the North African, predominantly Arab popular uprisings against Corrupt, Authoritarian Regimes, and Military Rulers, therein neatly balkanizing any process of Pan-African unified political resistance along racial, religious, and cultural fault lines (that could threaten or curtail Western redivision of Africa’s resources) while simultaneously corralling the continents youth movements, democratic and humanitarian movements behind the Barb-wire parameters of State sponsored perpetual “war on terror.”

The use of the contextual term “Arab Spring” to characterize the mass uprising of NORTH AFRICANS against the rule of their despotic Arab elites is purposely and artfully spun to discourage restless sub-Saharan Black Africa and its Muslim populations, also subjected to corrupt military and authoritarian regimes, from emulating their North African counterparts. The media created notion of an “Arab Spring” disingenuously appeals to the “Anti-Arab” sentiments among many Pan-Africans especially in the Black Diaspora. ECOWAS and the African Union’s recent support of French military intervention in Mali and as US surrogate in Somalia, and else where on the African continent are testimony to how eagerly Africa’s political elite are utilizing the “West’s war terror” to secure their positions and prop up their power while ignoring persecuted and marginalized Muslim minority populations. In Nigeria the US is on the ground supporting the Christian dominated government’s “anti-terrorist actions” in the North of the country against an Islamic Boko Haram insurgency. In Somalia, the US drone war against Al Shabab has spilled over into neighboring countries, like Eritrea, Al-Yemen and has led to tribal unrest in Northern Kenya. While the US and its European Allies seemed appalled by the Muslim insurgencies in the North of Mali (consistently failing to mentioned that this crisis was long in the making and connected to the Western European’s deposing of Libya’s Ghadaffi and the silent collusion of Black Africa’s leaders with his overthrow) both the US and Europe are feign no horror or outrage by events in the Congo.

Africa, A War Zone Without End

Nearly 3 million people have died in Congo in a four-year war over Coltan, a heat-resistant mineral ore widely used in cellphones, laptops and playstations and other strategic minerals. Eighty percent of the world’s coltan reserves are in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Often dismissed as an ethnic war, or political contest for control of the central Government (hence management of billion dollar contracts with multi-national Mining Conglomerates, Corporate Consortiums, and the like) the real conflict in the Congo is for its natural resources sought by foreign corporations — diamonds, tin, copper, gold, but mostly coltan”

In an article titled “Why the U.S. Won’t Help”, a Nairobi newspaper explained, ‘Right from the days of the Cold War, Western governments have been comfortable with a situation in which African regimes squandered meager resources on the instruments of war, borrowing from the West to finance domestic consumption. The war in the Congo and the countries involved in it are a case in point’… In 1998, the State Department licensed commercial weapons sales by U.S. manufacturers to sub-Saharan Africa worth up to $64 million, on top of the $12 million in government-to-government deliveries that year. These figures have quadrupled since 1998 and the region is no closer to stability than it was when Patrice Lumumba was assassinated by the US, French and Belgians in 1960s.

The hypocrisy of the US and Europe asking Africa’s political elite to develop and democratize while cutting levels of non-military international aid and increasing weapons and military training to the continent’s Armies does not seem to have registered with African-Americans, neither those (Pan-Africans) who claim solidarity with the current crop of African leaders, or African-American’s elected to public office. This lack of outspoken opposition to US militarization of Africa, especially under the Obama administration is inexcusable and attributable to the uncritical and unprincipled support of the Obama regime by African-Americans. Moreover, Obama’s policy of destabilization and “democratic regime change” of governments suggest that there is little real commitment to developing Africa’s human resources and creating a new “partnership” with Africa. The U.S. needs to redirect the focus away from strengthening military capacity of African States, coopting ethnic regional differences to achieve U.S. objectives and supporting corrupt national elites and more toward promoting human development in Africa.

 

Original BPP members open letter to T.I. and other Hip-Hop artists

To Killer Mike, Cardi B, Kanye, Jay-Z, P-Diddy, Ludacris, 50 Cent and others:

Greetings and solidarity to each of you. In recognition of your individual voice, influence and cultural following among current generations of Black people – Africans in the Diaspora and on the continent – we salute you. 

While we only know you from the public domain, we know that many of you come from backgrounds where you faced poverty, police brutality, lack of healthcare and other forms of oppression like most Black people. We all recognize that we are in a watershed period of economic and government failure, a pandemic and now a resistance movement from which things will never emerge the same. 

What we all do in this period will directly impact the fortunes, survival and freedom dreams of Black people and others around the world who suffer from the same oppression. Whether its South American favelas, South African shanty towns, Palestinian territories or the Black urban ghettoes of racist America, capitalism and white supremacy has turned the entire world into a ghetto for the profits of a few. So, we should pay attention to each other, because here, in the heart of racist America, we are all we have and, along with our true allies, are truly all we need. 

Individually we who write this letter are former members of the original Black Panther Party, co-founded in 1966 by the late Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale in Oakland, California. We were targets of the FBI’s infamous Counter Intelligence Program (codename COINTELPRO) which killed many of our comrades, including Fred Hampton, Mark Clark and numerous other Panthers and revolutionary freedom fighters. 

We are veterans of government search and destroy missions that forced our beloved Comrade Assata Shakur into exile. We are former Black Political Prisoners who spent decades in U.S. prisons, like our comrades Sundiata Acoli, Jalil Muntaqim and Mumia Abdul-Jamal who are still locked down today. In short, we were front line targets of government efforts to kill and destroy the Black radical movements for civil and human rights, including the right to self-determination. 

Some of us were also racist law enforcement’s worst nightmare, armed combatants in the revolutionary Black underground, the Black Liberation Army (BLA). Much of our history in our people’s struggle has been kept away from you and seemingly unavailable to your generation as you reinvent what was done in the past. Our people’s enemies haven’t changed; circumstances and conditions have. History never repeats itself – but it damn sure can rhyme. 

The question is where do we, Black people, oppressed peoples, go from here? What is to be done? Make no mistake, we are still at war. A war that began when, as Malcolm said, “Plymouth Rock landed on us,” and it has continued to this day unabated.

It is our duty as revolutionary freedom fighters to pass on lessons, wisdom, knowledge and experiences to the next generation of freedom fighters, cultural workers and activists. In that manner, an oppressed people can resist domination from one generation to the next without reinventing failures, pitfalls or the mistakes of the previous generation. 

It is our enemy’s job to prevent this and isolate one generation from the other. It is their duty to denigrate the history of militant and radical traditions and burnish the history of integrationists who think we can simply vote our way out of this problem. 

It is for this reason that we have stepped forward at this neo-fascist moment in history driven by the current crisis of capitalist culture, an ongoing pandemic and the now renewed attention and massive demonstrations brought on by ongoing police murders in our community. 

We have chosen to focus this letter on you because our enemies constantly target you to help “calm” the people down. They hope your new class status will outweigh your racial and class analysis. 

You have a chance to prove them wrong and, with your resources and influence, you can be crucial to the collective survival of our people. Tattoos, expensive cars and private jets don’t inoculate anyone from a disease and don’t render you bullet proof. We have to collectively provide for our own human agency and not delude ourselves into thinking it’s safer to integrate into a maligned system of greed and dehumanization. 

Some may say we as Panther veterans are not the Black people you should be seen talking to. Niggas should know their place, we’ve been told, and this is one reason that powerless Black folks have sports figures, actors, musicians and brought-off politicians as their public opinion makers. The voices of the disenfranchised are only heard when they rage against the machine that has ground down their lives. 

We have all been encouraged by the energy of the Black masses and our allies in protesting the murder of George Floyd but, as each of you is well aware, the murder and brutality visited upon our people is nothing aberrational or new. The butchering, torture and dehumanization of Black people extends back to the days of bullwhips, castrations and mass rape on the plantations of America’s European “founding fathers” and continues to this day. 

. . . we should pay attention to each other, because here, in the heart of racist America, we are all we have and, along with our true allies, are truly all we need. 

This is the legacy from which modern law enforcement in America derived its overarching purpose, the protection of property and wealth, not people – especially not Black people. No amount of training, social sensitivity, counseling or smaller police forces will change the current impact of this history on law enforcement. Only our control of public safety in our communities will break this historical context for modern law enforcement. This begins with decentralization of the police and community control of public safety. 

This season of political struggle is indeed about “the ballot and the bullet.” To organize the former, the ballot, all progressive and radical forces in America need to come together in a United Front Against Fascism and the militarized police state. This is what the BPP did at the height of the tumultuous ‘60s, resulting in delaying the outright consolidation of right-wing racist takeover of American foreign and domestic policy. 

We must also look beyond solutions that are strictly based on legislative reform, voting or individual capitalist enterprises. Black folks must survive institutional racist paradigms of power and exercise political and social self-determinant power. 

The public platforms each of you have can go a long way in creating this tactical and strategic organizing vision. With this in mind, we ask you who have a certain sway over the attitudes and minds of today’s Black youth to do the following: 

  • Let’s meet and talk through a strategy based on liberating Black People and our respective roles.
  • Help create new cooperative enterprises where ownership is shared and its directed towards the needs of our people, not consumerist enterprises. 
  • Support radical and revolutionary Black organizations that have a history of accomplishment and institution building in our community that is independent of major corporate donations, government grants or foundation founding. 
  • Through your media reach, support the current rebellion in the streets and mass organizing for radical change.
  • If you are opposed to property destruction, then call for massive demonstrations at key government and private installations and give free concerts to ensure large numbers of people come out.
  • Work with us and others to create and fund an independent Black political platform and candidates with radical demands for Black control and redistribution of this country’s wealth and reparations. 
  • Let us create a Black Red Cross where we become our own first responders in times of natural or man-made disasters and pandemics. 
  • Fight for the demilitarization and the decentralization of the police where the local community through local boards control the hiring, firing and disciplining of police in their community. 
  • Let us create a system of not only a new policing paradigm but one where we create a community restorative justice and end the prison industrial complex.

These are just some of the things you and we can do to create a united Black Liberation Front to challenge our oppressive conditions in the United States and erase the class divide between the overwhelming majority of our people and those few like you who have some wealth and influence. This is all our opportunity to do what’s best for our people and be on the right side of history. 

Signed by original Black Panther members Kathleen Cleaver, Sekou Odinga, Cleo Silvers, Jamal Joseph, Yasmeen Majid, Victor Houston, Paula Peebles, Bilal Sunni Ali, Jihad Abdulmumit, Dhoruba Bin-Wahad.

Kathleen Cleaver

Sekou Odinga

Cleo Silvers

Jamal Joseph

Yasmeen Majid

Victor Houston

Paula Peebles

Bilal Sunni Ali

Jihad Abdulmumit

Dhoruba Bin Wahad

 

  

Original Panther Dhoruba Bin Wahad stabbed in back by National Action Network & NAACP

Posted in Black Talk Radio Network

Report by Kalonji Changa, June 6, 2014

UPDATE!!! NAN CLAYTON COUNTY AND NAACP BUST SNEAK MOVE IN POLICE BRUTALITY CASE!

NAN Clayton County and NAACP Clayton County Hold Secret Meeting With Clayton County Police Chief to Undermine Dhoruba Bin-Wahad’s Legal Case and Support Team Against Police Brutality

NAN leaders in Clayton County Georgia under direction of its national leadership headed by government informant Al Sharpton, along with NAACP Clayton County leadership, secretly attempted to establish a working relationship (or “protocol” as Police Chief Gregory Porter described it) with the Clayton County Police Chief to derail the political ramifications of the Police brutality case brought by Dhoruba Bin-Wahad against Clayton County Police officers.

According to Bin-Wahad’s Support Team (which includes activist clergy, Muslims, Civil Rights Activists, and prominent critics of Black institutional politics), NAN and the local NAACP met with the Clayton County Police Chief to discuss how to handle Bin-Wahad’s brutality complaint. This meeting took place behind the backs of Bin-Wahad’s Attorney Mawuli Davis and his lead spokespersons, Reverend Derrick Rice of Sankofa United Church of Christ and Kalonji Changa of the FTP Movement. This secret meeting was revealed to the spokespersons of Bin-Wahad’s Support Team by Chief Gregory Porter during a meeting at the Clayton County Police Headquarters following the recent Town Hall forum convened by Bin-Wahad’s SupportTeam. The forum launched as a national campaign to reign over the militarized law enforcement agencies that have been responsible for dozens of deaths in theBlack, poor, and marginalized communities of America. Continue reading 

 

 

 

 

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SUBHEADING

Look for Me in the Whirlwind: From the Panther 21 to 21st Century Revolutions

In 1969, 21 members of the New York branch of the Black Panther Party were rounded up and indicted on multiple charges of violent acts and conspiracies. The membership of the NY 21, which includes Dhoruba bin Wahad, is largely forgotten and unknown. Their legacy, however—reflected upon here in this special edition—provides essential truths which have remained largely hidden.

Order Look for Me in the Whirlwind directly from Dhoruba bin-Wahad
Copies of the book can be ordered directly from Dhoruba bin-Wahad using Paypal.

 

Adding Insult to Injury: 
Media Bias Against Dhoruba Bin-Wahad and Other Political Prisoners

By Bob Lederer

(excerpted from “Let Freedom Ring” [PM Press, 2008])

While the corporate (and white-controlled) media often renders people of color either invisible or criminal, the coverage of imprisoned political activists of color intensifies these distortions.

Were such people jailed in any other country, the U.S. media would correctly consider them — convicted on either fabricated allegations or “criminal” charges for clearly political acts — to be political prisoners.

According to the New York-based Center for Constitutional Rights, there are currently more than 100 U.S. political prisoners, the majority Black, Puerto Rican and Native American. Only occasionally are their cases covered even minimally (usually just upon conviction), and the rare, hard-hitting investigative stories face strong right-wing attacks. Consider, for example, the case of Dhoruba Bin-Wahad (formerly Richard Moore), a Black activist imprisoned in New York from 1971 to 1990.

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Beggars On Horseback: Creating a Pan-African Power Paradigm for the 21st Century

BEGGARS ON HORSEBACK

CREATING A PAN AFRICAN POWER PARADIGM FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

“Set a beggar on horseback and he’ll ride to the devil…”Tshiluba proverb

FORWARD

This is an Essay on Africa written on the eve of the 21st Century. Initially penned while the author was living in Africa as a cofounder of the Institute For the Development of Pan-African Policy, IDPAP, this essay was intended to serve as that NGO’s Geopolitical, and Economic Overview at the time. Though written in 1998-99, much of what now besets Africa, the AU, and African leaders have their roots in the Historical analysis presented here. Because of its length, “Beggars On Horseback” will be reproduced here in three parts, the last of which will address the current Western, U.S., and Chinese expropriation of Africa’s strategic minerals and resources under the Rubric of Globalization, and the “War on Islamic Extremism or “Terrorism.”     DBW

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